MONDAY June 02, 1:30pm - 3:00pm | Room 304
TOPIC AREA: SECURITY
KEYWORD: HARDWARE SECURITY
EVENT TYPE: MONDAY TUTORIAL
Tutorial 4: Introduction to Hardware Security

Speakers:
Ramesh Karri - New York Univ., Brooklyn, NY
Farinaz Koushanfar - Rice Univ., Houston, TX
Ozgur Sinanoglu - New York Univ., Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
Organizers:
Ramesh Karri - New York Univ., Brooklyn, NY
Farinaz Koushanfar - Rice Univ., Houston, TX
Ozgur Sinanoglu - New York Univ., Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
Globalization of Integrated Circuit (IC) design is making designers and users of IC and Intellectual Property (IP) re-assess their trust in hardware. Hardware is increasingly prone to side channel analysis, reverse engineering, cloning and counterfeiting, IP piracy and malicious modifications (i.e. hardware trojans).    The tutorial will start with why hardware security and trust are important design objectives. It will survey embedded systems security including state-of-the-art and open problems. Next, IC reverse engineering, IP piracy and counterfeiting will be presented. This will be followed by encrypting the functionality of an IC as it passes through the potentially untrustworthy phases of the global design flow. In the last part, vulnerabilities introduced by EDA tools and how they can be strengthened will be discussed. The tutorial will conclude with important takeaways and open problems.
Ramesh Karri (http://eeweb.poly.edu/karri/) is a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering. He has a Ph.D. in Computer Science and Engineering from the University of California at San Diego. His research interests include trustworthy hardware (integrated circuits to processor architectures); High assurance nanoscale integrated circuits, architectures, and systems; VLSI Design and Test; Interaction between security and reliability. He has over 150 journal and conference publications. He has written two invited articles in IEEE Computer on Trustworthy Hardware, an invited article on Digital Logic Design using Memristors in Proceedings of IEEE and an Invited article in IEEE Computer on Reliable Nanoscale Systems. He is the recipient of the Humboldt Fellowship and the National Science Foundation CAREER Award. He is the area director for cyber security of the NY State Center for Advanced Telecommunications Technologies at NYU School of Engineering; Hardware security lead of the Center for research in interdisciplinary studies in security and privacy -CRISSP (http://crissp.poly.edu/), co-founder of the Trust-Hub (http://trust-hub.org/) and organizes the annual red team blue team event at NYU, the Embedded Systems Security Challenge (http://www.poly.edu/csaw2012/csaw-embedded). He co-founded and served as the chair of the IEEE Computer Society Technical Committee on Nanoscale architectures. He co-founded and serves on the steering committee of the IEEE/ACM Symposium on Nanoscale Architectures (NANOARCH). He served as the Program Chair and General Chair of several conferences including IEEE Symposium on Hardware Oriented Security and Trust (HOST), IEEE Symposium on Defect and Fault Tolerant Nano VLSI Systems, IEEE/ACM NANOARCH. He serves on several program committees including DAC, VTS, ICCD, HOST, DFT, DTIS, and NANOARCH. He is the Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security, IEEE Transactions on CAD, and ACM Journal of Emerging Technologies in Computing. He is a IEEE Computer Society Distinguished Visitor 2013-2014. He organized/delivered invited tutorials on Trustworthy Hardware (including 2012 IEEE VLSI Test Symposium 2012, IEEE International Conference on Computer Design 2012, IEEE North Atlantic Test Workshop 2013, Design Automation and Test in Europe 2013, IEEE International Test Conference 2013, IEEE Latin American Test Workshop 2014, IEEE/ACM Design Automation Conference 2014, and IEEE ).

Farinaz Koushanfar is currently an Associate Professor with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX, where she directs the Adaptive Computing and Embedded Systems (ACES) Lab and Texas Instruments Leadership University Program. She received the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering and computer science and the M.A. degree in statistics, both from University of California Berkeley, in 2005. Her research interests include hardware security, design intellectual property protection, adaptive and low power embedded systems design, and design automation. Farinaz has over 100 journal, conference, and book chapter publications. She has written articles about on Trustworthy Hardware for IEEE Design and Test, IEEE Computers, and Proceedings of IEEE. She is an associate editor of IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security, and has served on the editorial of IEEE Transactions on VLSI, as well has guest editorial for IEEE Design and Test, Proceedings of IEEE, and IEEE Journal of Emerging and Selected Topics in Circuits and Systems. Professor Koushanfar serves as the technical program committee members of several security and design automation conferences including IEEE Symposium of Security&Privacy (S&P), ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security (CCS), USENIX Security, Cryptographic Hardware and Embedded Systems (CHES), and Design Automation Conference (DAC). She is the general chair of the IEEE Symposium on Hardware-Oriented Security and Trust (HOST) and IEEE/CASS/CEDA Computer-Aided Network DEsign (CANDE) Committee this year. Farinaz is the founder of Women Excel (http://excel.rice.edu/) and a co-founder of the Trust-Hub (http://trust-hub.org/). She organized/delivered invited tutorials on Trustworthy Hardware in various venues including ICCAD, DAC, ACM CCS/STC, and AHS. Prof. Koushanfar's awards and honors include the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) from president Obama, the ACM SIGDA Outstanding New Faculty Award, National Academy of Science Kavli Foundation fellowship, NSF CAREER Award, Young faculty awards from DARPA, ONR, ARO, National Academy of Engineering Frontiers of Engineering, and MIT TR-35 (35 World's top innovators below 35).

Ozgur Sinanoglu is an assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at New York University Abu Dhabi. He obtained his B.S. degrees in Electrical & Electronics Engineering, and Computer Engineering both from Bogazici University, Turkey. He received his M.A. and Ph.D. in Computer Science and Engineering from University of California, San Diego in 2001 and 2004, respectively. He worked for two years at Qualcomm in San Diego as a senior Design-for-Testability engineer, primarily responsible for developing cost-effective test solutions for low-power SOCs. After a 4-year academic experience at Kuwait University, he has joined in Fall 2010 New York University in Abu Dhabi. He is the director of the Design-for-Excellence (DfX) Lab at NYUAD. His primary field of research is the reliability and security of integrated VLSI circuits, mostly focusing on design-for-testability and design-for-trust. He has more than 100 conference and journal papers in addition to 15 issued and pending patents and has given more than 10 tutorials at conferences. He is the recipient of two consecutive IBM PhD Fellowship awards in 2001 and 2002, Best PhD Dissertation Award at the CSE Department of UC San Diego, Best Paper Award of IEEE VLSI Test Symposium 2011 and co-authored a paper that received the Best Student Paper Award of ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security 2013. His research is being funded by three major grants from the US National Science Foundation, Semiconductor Research Corporation and Advanced Technology Investment Company (UAE).